Prevalence of Flat Foot in Primary School Students Aged 7-12 Years, in Zanjan City, Iran

  • Marzieh Pashmdarfard Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Paramedical Sciences, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran. AND Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Malek Amini Mail Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Seyyed Hassan Sanei Department of Basic Sciences in Rehabilitation, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Maedeh Latifi Shirdareh Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Paramedical Sciences, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran.
  • Kimia Hedayati Marzbali Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Paramedical Sciences, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran.
  • Narges Ghafardzadeh Namazi Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Paramedical Sciences, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran.
  • Ali Ostadzadeh Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
Keywords:
Flat foot, Prevalence, Primary school students

Abstract

Introduction: Physical conditions of people are among the essential components of their health. Any structural or physical changes of the human body can affect the performance of the individual. Flat foot is one of the most common problems in musculoskeletal disorders that can be addressed in childhood, and its complications can be reduced by providing appropriate and timely treatments. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of flat foot in primary school students (aged 7-12 years) in Zanjan City, Iran to improve the effectiveness of interventions.
Materials and Methods: This research was a cross-sectional study to assess the prevalence of flat foot types among 1700 girls and boys students aged 7-12 years in the elementary schools of Zanjan City.
Results: A total of 900 male (53%) and 800 female (47%) students participated in this study. The samples’ Mean±SD age, height, and weight were 9.63±1.55 years, 132.93±13.42 cm, and 32.75±10.46 kg. The prevalence of different types of flat feet were as follows: 491 (28.9%) children with smooth flat foot, 12 (0.7%) children with rigid flat foot, and 1197 (70.4%) children without any type of flat feet. The ordinal regression model showed that the highest level of the flat foot was observed among the third-grade students with 33%, and the lowest level of the flat foot was among the second-grade students with 26.3%. Weight was the strongest predictor for the flat foot in the students. By 1 kg weight increase, the probability of flat foot increases by 1.065 times.
Conclusion: The prevalence of foot flat among primary school students in Zanjan City had a high rate. There is a significant relationship between the flat foot and weight , therefore nutritional interventions are necessary for these children.

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Published
2020-03-16
How to Cite
1.
Pashmdarfard M, Amini M, Sanei SH, Latifi Shirdareh M, Hedayati Marzbali K, Ghafardzadeh Namazi N, Ostadzadeh A. Prevalence of Flat Foot in Primary School Students Aged 7-12 Years, in Zanjan City, Iran. jmr. 13(4):207-214.
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